The Eco-Capabilities Project

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Two Fantastical Maps

These two new fantastical maps have been co-created with children as part of the Eco-capabilities project, a research programme exploring how learning creatively in nature can help the well-being of young children. It is led by Professor Nicola Walshe,  University College London Institute of Education, who was awarded funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) in 2019. The research team came alongside two ArtScaping projects that took place in spring and summer 2021 with Shirley Community Primary School and Howard Community Academy.  The project diary documents and shares the ongoing adventures for these communities and can be viewed below. More details about the research programme is here.

I have learnt so much about exploring the world around us from the children - they have reminded me of the value of slowing down and taking time to just ‘be’ in the outdoors. Importantly I have seen how making art in nature is precious for everyone, both as individuals and as communities, helping us think together about how we care for each other and the environment.
Professor Nicola Walshe

Watch this short film above to see highlights from these projects or the two longer films below to see in depth what happened in these projects. Thee were  made with small groups of children from each school by artist Susanne Jasilek. These films capture a sense of the spaces the children explored and their experiences through conversations with them and the artists and educators they worked with.

Artists Sally Todd and Hilary Cox Condron worked with the two year 4 classes at Shirley Primary School alongside teachers Emily Irvine and Anna Ullmann and their colleagues. Also supporting these projects were artists Tonka Uzu and Libby Walmsley. Artists Caroline Wendling and Filipa Pereira-Stubbs lead the work at Howard Community Academy, working with teachers Emma Walker and Sally Attwood and their classes of year 4 and years 5 and 6. Supporting these projects were artist Alfie Carpenter and recently retired headteacher Amanda Morris-Drake.

Initial evidence for this research proposal was gathered by Anglia Ruskin’s Dr Nicola Walshe and Dr Elsa Lee from the University of Cambridge when they worked with CCI in 2018. This was set out in a recent chapter in the Research Handbook on Childhoodnature published by Springer and written with Ruth Sapsed and Jo Holland from CCI. It detailed how CCI artists observed how the creative activities they took part in with the children had a significant effect on the children’s wellbeing – particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The study found artists could illustrate how their work encouraged children’s confidence and independence, as well as stimulating new evidence of creativity. 

Dr Walshe said in the announcement of the award: 

There is significant national and global interest in children’s wellbeing and mental health, with figures suggesting that 10% of children in England suffer a severe mental health illness, and that suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people. This figure is higher among those from deprived areas.

We believe that an innovative way to reconnect children to their local environment is using art in familiar outdoor places. Our research so far has found that artists undertaking this practice have observed how it encourages the children’s independence and sense of agency, develops their confidence, and cultivates a healthy sense of adventure! However, we need further evidence to determine why this is the case.

This AHRC grant will enable us to explore this further, working alongside the artists in two primary schools over the course of a school term to explore exactly how children benefit from this unique way of learning.

The outcomes will be of particular significance for teachers, schools and their communities but also for policy makers through access to evidence-based knowledge about arts-based learning in nature and how this supports children’s wellbeing.

A new webinar series is planned to share learning from the research and the first in this series was recorded during lockdown. It reflects on a CCI project with Mayfield Primary School and Under Fives Roundabout Preschool in 2018 - Lost Words and Found Connections - and has contributions from Nicola Walshe (ARU), Pippa Joyce and Jake Holt (Mayfield Primary School), Dana Harrison (Under Fives Roundabout Nursery), Filipa Pereira-Stubbs (CCI Artist), and Ruth Sapsed (CCI Director) .

The project is supported by an advisory panel and we are grateful to Hilary Bungay, Joel Chalfen, Kevin Jones and David Whitley for their support in this.

We are nature…everything is nature

07/10/21

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Alfie Carpenter and Caroline Wendling sharing an early version of the Fantastical Map of Howard Community Academy
Alfie Carpenter and Caroline Wendling sharing an early version of the Fantastical Map of Howard Community Academy

We return today to join assemblies at Howard Community Academy and Shirley Community Primary School and present each school with their new Fantastical Map.

These maps are made up of words and images created by the children themselves as they adventured in their school grounds alongside artists and their educators. Each offers a remarkable celebration of the many different voices and contributors to the work. Alfie Carpenter’s map of Howard Community Primary is unusual as the for the first time it exists as a 3D artwork built up from about 100 collaged layers and the original will now be hung in the University College London Institute of Education. Tonka Uzu’s map of Bramblefields, as with previous fantastical maps, was created as a digital file though still with as many layers. This alone sparked another brilliant conversation with the children involved about the creative process as they marvelled at the size of the computer file and how the map had been made.

These maps are a joy to commission as they bring together so many threads. Both Alfie and Tonka, who joined CCI as new artists and worked also within the projects themselves, have carefully shared their drafts and ideas, checking in with colleagues and children at many stages and generously opening their work to new ideas.  Every child in these two schools has also been given a copy of their new school map to take home and share.

Reflecting on the process Alfie commented:

I’ve painted on these vein like pathways – almost like neurological pathways. You can follow one and sort of meander with your eye. They go into different areas. You take yourself on a journey with them.  Here’s Daisy’s head being a bit clouded too - but as we move out to the outdoors it changes and the imagination is bursting out.  There’s an explosion of ideas. I feel funny taking credit for it – my relationship to it is one of pride for the children. Everything here is from a child – there are about a hundred layers altogether. The ownership with this is with the children and our collaboration.

Each time we dip back into them we appreciate new discoveries and remember the pleasure of the creative process we’ve shared with the children. We hope you enjoy exploring them too. There are other fantastical maps co-created with children and their communities that can be explored here.

The Colours of Shirley fields

09/08/21

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Artists Libby Walmsley, Sally Todd, Hilary Cox Condron and Tonka Uzu (left to right)
Artists Libby Walmsley, Sally Todd, Hilary Cox Condron and Tonka Uzu (left to right)

(by Hilary Cox Condron) Yesterday was an emotional day – the ten-week long journey of creativity, exploration, wonder, friendship and eco-capabilities with Shirley Primary School pupils had reached fruition , which we marked by installing an exhibition of the children’s work at the school. Like all projects during this period, plans had had to be  constantly changed and rearranged, and although there was some disappointment that parents couldn’t be invited, it was wonderful to reflect on the project together and to see the young artists and explorers talk about their experiences with younger pupils.

Run around, play around, enjoy the day around us.

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Run around, play around, enjoy the day around us

Sharing the artwork was a celebration of  all the children had achieved over the weeks: the maps of Bramblefields and the school grounds; the discoveries noted with detailed observational drawings and comments; the exploration of space, sounds and mark making; and the fantastical adventures told through story writing, paintings and sculpture.

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The Colours of Shirley fields
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The Colours of Shirley fields
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The Colours of Shirley fields
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The Colours of Shirley fields
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The Colours of Shirley fields

The exhibition was rich in creativity and exploration: we all felt the pride and joy, and we all enjoyed the strawberries and apple juice (thanks to Plumbs Dairy for their generous support of the day with these locally sourced treats!).

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Strawberries)

Proud Children/Proud Parents

07/07/21

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A final celebration day with Howard Community Academy

(by Filipa Pereira Stubbs and Caroline Wendling) We were so delighted to celebrate the culmination of eight weeks of collaboration with the children at Howard Community Academy. We have engaged with and explored a huge variety of materials and techniques, worked our ways through concepts and ideas around identity, and found new ways of working outside with nature, working differently with peers, and building new relationships with educators, artists and one another.

The children in Otter Class (9/10 year olds) started the celebrations by giving their peers in Fox Class (10/11 year olds) an art workshop, followed by showing visitors and teachers around the Gallery Number 10.  Gallery Number 10 is a classroom, temporarily repurposed as a space where the children have taken the lead in curating and exhibiting their work in progress and sketch books.  It’s also been a calm and focused space to work in.  It was joyous to hear different children explain their work, share their enthusiasm, and throughout the day, receive the audience they deserve.  Alfie Carpenter, the other artist working with this class, was also able to introduce to them how their work will become a new Fantastical Map for the school.

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A final celebration day with Howard Community Academy
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A final celebration day with Howard Community Academy

Badger Class (7/8 year olds) began their day sharing their memories of the project:
Felicity Going to the field for the first time
Amelia Sketching the trees
Shea Finding different kind of leaves
Evie Making the mini maquettes
Jack Making a pocket sketchbook
Ben Making sun photography
Harvey Putting makeup on my hands

Much more was remembered. We thought we would have to prompt the children, we were wrong. Something important had stuck for each of them. It made us wonder if making art is so profound that we will remember it in our bodies and minds years later. We talked about how art has the power to make us feel good because we use our brains and hands; they work in tandem. Something is created that wasn’t yet imagined.

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Drawing Together

In the context of this pandemic, to go outside with their bubble class, to share an activity designed as a class of skilled makers and observers of nature, became a celebration of thoughtfulness, kindness and joy. The Badger class designed an hours activity for the Rabbit class (6/7 years olds). It looked like this:

  • Draw as you listen to the sounds outside
  • Look for things that are the same but different and record them in sketchbooks
  • Imagine what the field will look like in the future  

Here are some of possible futures that were imagined for the field:
Jack Trees and flowers with robots watering the flowers, dinosaurs will come back to life
Ewin A graveyard for animals and people
Shea A place for extinct animals to come back to life
Jack C A zoo for small bugs
Sophia Trees built like robots

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Carrying the huge sculptures outdoors
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Installing the sculptures in the Howard grounds

Amazingly, the rain held off for the afternoon, and we were able to proudly carry our huge sculptures outdoors, installing them in the special Howard grounds we’ve had the privilege and joy to work in. Excitement, laughter and delight were evident as we all curated the work together. We had not anticipated such a sense of pride and pleasure from the children. We had not anticipated parent after parent telling us about how their child came home every Monday with so much to tell and share. Parents, siblings and grandparents came. Many photos were taken of children standing proudly close to their sculptures.  Something very special was unravelling in front of us; a celebration of art and nature that we could safely share.

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Sculptures in the Howard grounds

For weeks we have carried the thought of each and every child daily, caring about their wellbeing, thinking and devising new and creative ways to make art. Exercising the children’s understanding of the importance of nature and the power that nature has on us as human beings. The connections and observations children made during the weeks made for moments of happiness and contentment. Over the weeks we noticed that some branches are rough and others smooth, how insects moved and ate through the leaves, how flowers, leaves and trees all have their very own shapes, colours and scents. We imagined stories and future worlds. We will never forget the pride that each child took in making each element of their sculptures, how they became a representation of their own self and their understanding of the natural world.

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Sculpture
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Sculpture
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Sculpture
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Sculpture

A special thanks too Amanda Morris-Drake for all her support during these weeks. Amanda not only supported the work in Badger class, she also taught children how to grow from seeds and created a garden with them. Amanda shared with them the importance of care and love for the living world.

Pockets and the imagination

04/06/21

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Image of pocket

(by Caroline Wendling) It’s always a great pleasure being back at Howard Community Academy. It’s our sixth day together and Harvey and Alarna tell me excitedly about the art they are now doing at home. I notice how Ben always has a story to share on our way to beyond the green gate!

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Children outside

I start the session by reading The Quangle Wangle Hat by Edward Lear as we sit in the grass. The children all listen and ask questions and we noticed that some children who aren’t usually that vocal start to speak. We always let our pencil wander to the sounds in our sketchbook. Amelia makes a wonderful drawing that looks a little like a landscape. She says I could hear traffic and I imagined a car going fast.

I ask them what is imagination?
Shea Something that doesn’t exist and you can think of it in your head.
Sophie Something you think about.
Kai Something that isn’t real.
Alarna Dinosaurs aren’t real but they existed.

I invite everyone to draw from imagination and be inspired by nature. They explore the site with their sketchbooks at hand and take notes. Mia finds a dinosaur toy and draws an ice cream cone with the texture of the dinosaur and a flower as the ice ball on top. Ben notices the red bits on the leaf. Evie-Mae tells me I imagine something in my head and then draw it.

Amelia takes Mrs Atwood on a trail of caterpillars. She has noticed their routes from one leave to another - they had eaten through a whole row of trees. She also demonstrates their sizes using her hands!

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Hands image
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Hands image
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Hands image
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Hands image
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Hands image

Back in the classroom the children imagine pockets and I encourage them to think of a pocket with magic powers that holds the most treasured, important and special of things. What would you put in that pocket? I ask.
Ricky A flag, three trees, a sheep and the Quangle Wangle.
Jack A dragon, a zombie and a cactus man.
Sophia A person with a cat on the head, a song and something else.
Amelia a family tree and a unicorn.

Children fabricate the pockets out of layers of tissue paper. As they cut out their special things, I notice how attentive and dedicated to their tasks everyone is.  Despite the difficulty of using thin layers of tissue and PVA glue, nothing stops the children from creating layer upon layer. Drawn objects become hidden under the tissue paper and others come to the front with more drawing. The pockets remind me of how I discover in my very own pockets things I had totally forgotten, things collected and stored sometime ago. I see how the children are using drawing in this instance  as a way to create stories. All the characters and props in these very special pockets are ready to be taken out for the sharing of each and every imaginative story. Going round the classroom to hear about what is inside the pockets made for delightful conversations and exchanges.  Evie-Mae asks me to hide hers as it is a pocket containing secrets.

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Pocket images
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Pocket images
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Pocket images
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Pocket images
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Pocket images

Pathway to the Portal

01/06/21

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Children on pathway

(by Sally Todd) The children often mention the word portal when we visit Bramblefields, as if the nature reserve offers an imaginary, as well as physical, space to explore, create and dream in.

In preparation for our third visit, I show the children some examples of Land art, and we think about different natural materials you can use for creative expression in the landscape…rocks, chalk, sticks, leaves, mud, ice…nature is endlessly inspiring. The children ponder the scale of The ‘Uffington White Horse’ chalk carving, excitedly remark on Robert Smithson’s ’Spiral Jetty’… it looks like a monkey tail curled up, a plant opening or the handle of an ancient staff, and wonder whether Agnes Denes’ ‘Living Pyramid’ of plants was made by a mummy?

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Uffington White Horse
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Spiral Jetty
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Living Pyramid

We arrive at our open air ‘studio’ of Bramblefields where some plants have now grown taller than us, and there is a heady scent of blossom after the rain. We are learning to enter the site quietly so we can listen out for birdsong and the sounds of the elements. Lottie notices a broken bird’s egg, Alanna says it’s snowing blossom!

There is more excitement as Rowan and Dylan find what they think is a fox den, a beautiful construction of twigs and Rosie says it looks just like the land art I showed them of Andy Goldsworthy’s sculpture….nature and art intertwined.

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Fox den
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Andy Goldsworthy a scene from River and Tides

The children find sticks and leaves and start to work together, negotiating and sometimes blending their ideas and stories, as they become absorbed in the detail of their land art and the natural materials:

I wanted to do mine about vampires and I wanted to do mine on history so we made the history of bats.
We were digging a hole, we cracked the ground…we found a hazelnut…we snapped the earth to go to another universe…I can push the stick down to go to China.
We found this leaf that looks like it has been in the fire as its black lines look like nerves on a human body.

Elaborate nature patterns appear on the ground and delicate sculptural installations of tied sticks and flower petals that depict: a stick family, fairy houses with fairy dust, castles and a boat sailing to Canada.

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Children’s Land art
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Children’s Land art
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Children’s Land art
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Children’s Land art
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Children’s Land art
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Children’s Land art

The children are so settled and engrossed in making that we run out of time and, in the rush of wanting to show each other our land art, some pieces get knocked or trampled on and we’re reminded of the often ephemeral and fragile quality of land art…and of our natural world.

Back in the classroom we revisit the imaginary and the real; some children painting sensitive studies of an eye-shaped log, drawing beloved animals and making ancient mysterious worlds in an explosion of colour. We also experiment with drawing with feathers dipped in blackberry ink, watching with amazement as the red ink turns violet then blue.  We are in the old times writing with quills!  We are also in our times sharing and expressing our stories of now and the things that we experience and the things that matter to us.

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Children’s art
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Children’s art
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Children’s art
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Children’s art
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Children’s art
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Children’s art

As a wonderful extra gift to the day, Alanna reads us her poem that she wrote the night before our outing….

Leaf’s emerald green, water crystal blue
I like walks in the park, do you too?
Birds tweeting, dogs barking
Grass swaying as the people were passing
Re-uniting with the water
The flowers start getting taller
Nature pleased, nature’s beauty

Artists 'imaginate' says Katie

20/05/21

(by Filipa Pereira-Stubbs) What does an artist do? What does an explorer do? What is nature for? The Year 5 children (aged 9 and 10) at Howard Community Academy are thinking about these questions as we work together; two artists, one teacher, a teaching assistant, and sometimes a researcher.  

We begin our days together by changing the classroom, reorganising our thinking as we reorganise the furniture.  We need tables facing the windows. The windows can be open to let in fresh air. We can make a space so we can all be seen in one circle where we can to talk respectfully and lie on the floor as we rest and make art. Maybe we need a square…maybe we need a nest.  Led by the children, setting the scene has become the normal start to our day together.  We settle into a circle, say our names, and with the help of calming music, settle into our bodies.  Then we begin.

Artists paint, design, collage, work with children - inspire people…that was week one.  Four weeks later, and the thinking has become broader - artists are singers and songwriters, film makers, dancers - they sketch, create, doodle, scribble - artists imaginate says Katie.  Horizons are widened intellectually and physically as we explore the edgelands of their school grounds.

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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie

The children think more deeply about these ideas of exploring and being an artist  -
Explorers travel through spaces, and through ideas.
Nature is the best thing….it helps us in our mental health and helps us breathe.

There is so much to hear and absorb as the children explore the experience of being outdoors with their making.  They themselves are absorbing the various invitations to look, notice, see, imagine, write, share.  Together we notice colours, shapes, textures and try out ways of mark making, tearing paper, shaping. These sessions are full of words, ideas, attitudes, philosophies, and conversations.

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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie

Ms Walker, their teacher, has told us that the children had been doing all their schoolwork in the classroom until now and she is noticing on these days how the children are feeling special and more free. Her hope for them is to become more creative, less rigid.  Evalynne notices how special it is to have her own sketch book -  It's really nice to have a book you can just open and draw what you like.

In one session we create our own Amulets - inspired by Ted Hughes.  Created as the whole class initially, together we write the following:

Inside the family, the love.
Inside the love, the argument.
Inside the argument, the hatred.
Inside the hatred, the drama.
Inside the drama, the apology.
Inside the apology, the forgiveness.
Inside the forgiveness, the imaginations.
Inside the imaginations, the family.
 
Inside the kick, the force.
Inside the force,  the football.
Inside the football, the teamwork.
Inside the teamwork, the power.
Inside the power,  the strong.
Inside the strong, the fear.
Inside the fear, the encouragement.
Inside the encouragement, the relationship.
Inside the relationship, the cheerfulness.
Inside the cheerfulness, the sadness.
Inside the sadness, the negativity.
Inside the negativity, the kick.
 

We have also been mapping out portraits of ourselves and portraits of the trees as we map the landscape outside the classroom. This all happens alongside negotiating the changes that happen when you turn a classroom into a studio space, when you gift nine and ten year olds the freedom to follow their own ideas, to dare to get things wrong, and the time to start to notice and celebrate when they feel they’ve got it right. It feels as though we are beginning a relationship between who we are and what we notice and what we value.

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Artists imaginate says Katie

As we settle into drawing what we see I invite the children to add in something from their imaginations. What is there just below the surface of everyday routine?

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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie

For some of these children the imagination is an easy space to step into - for others, their self-consciousness holds them back, but slowly, slowly, with a light touch and constant vigilance for shifting nuances of self-doubt, there is a growing confidence, and a growing sense of self-worth.

At some point in every session we walk the distance away from the classroom, with the wind, with the changeable weather - scuttling clouds, sudden rain showers - and each week noticing the growing and multiplying daisies.  There is a vast expanse of green fields in their special space behind the locked gates. It feels as though we are creating nests to rest in there: this is the best thing… this is freedom, this is so exciting.

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Artists imaginate says Katie

The excitement of being outdoors is compelling, spending a whole day with friends is dizzying.  Within that, there are long spells of settling into the grass; quiet, safe, individual.  The conversations at these times whilst we draw are gentle, relaxed, open.

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Artists imaginate says Katie
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Artists imaginate says Katie

I sit with one boy and we watch with delight the dance of birds as they negotiate the strong winds.  Our conversation meanders easily - from the freedom of the bird to good times spent with his father inventing recipes.  We think together how cooking too can be creative, freeing.  On another occasion, another boy tells us of his sadness that day - a family member is leaving, and he shares that his sadness is feeling almost overwhelming - it might affect his drawing he says.  

Together with the teachers we enjoy that there are opportunities in this creative way of working for the children to choose how they want to interact with us the artists, and with the invitations to make.  Positive shifts in behaviours have been noticed by the teacher and TA, and their opportunity to work alongside the children is celebrated.

Exploring with colour

14/05/21

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Exploring with colour

Close your eyes and breathe deeply – feel the breeze on your face, roll your shoulders and wiggle your fingers.
What colours do we connect to emotions and memories?
What do different colours symbolise to us?

(by Hilary Cox Condron) Over these last few weeks we have been inviting the children to look closely at the colour and shapes in nature.

We started by reflecting on the work they had been doing in their sketchbooks –and the children each created a ‘nature square’ that they felt represented them.

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Exploring with colour
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Exploring with colour

I am …..clover fox…. rainbow leopard…a turquoise ocean….dream snake pyramid…evergreen elegance.

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Exploring with colour
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Exploring with colour
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Exploring with colour

We took time to explore outside, looking carefully at the shapes and colours and connecting the ‘nature square’ to the environment, whilst making notes and collections to take back to the class.

And then came the rain, hail and wind!

Being in the hail hurricane felt like world war 3…..it tickled and pierced into my skin….we laughed and ran and shouted…..I begged for it not to stop.

Back the classroom I asked what the children had brought back with them:

Sticks, golden leaves, new ideas, our imagination

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recording the shapes, colours and stories of Shirley School
Recording the shapes, colours and stories of Shirley School

Finally the children created a Shirley colour chart inspired by the nature around them. They mapped the area working with paint, watercolour pencils and found colours made with dandilions, grass and even teabags. Fantastical stories of Shirley were then added to these, such as Queen Glitter’s enchanted leaf necklace; the leaf carried by an injured horse that is being cared for by ‘HorseMan’; the ancient stone stolen from The Museum of Shirley; and the green dragon that oversees them all. 

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Exploring with colour
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Exploring with colour

Sitting in front of a blank piece of paper one child said: my imagination doesn’t work when I can only see wall, can I draw quietly outside? He took his sketchbook and quietly sat on his own in the playground to draw and we noticed how then his ideas could flow.

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Exploring with colour
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Exploring with colour

I am struck by how these sketchbooks are the works of artists, bringing together experiments in colour, markmaking, observation and storytelling.  I asked the children how they felt now: I’m exhausted… I’m happy…. it felt so exotic… it flowed…emotions, nature amazing… there are no words.

At times in these days we are able to visit Bramblefields, the nature reserve beside the school. We take time to prepare, pulling on wellies to walk there, then arriving, breathing in the air, and lying down quietly to tune in to the birds and nature around us. Here too we invite them to take a moment to really look at the surroundings and notice new things.

On day four we revisited ‘Mosaic Hill’ (or the sacrificial Viking magic mound of treasure as some children also described it).  We each took a china chip piece that we wanted to study and the children drew observational pieces of the mosaic and sat amongst the trees to explore the shapes.

I was struck that this week the school was also celebrating Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Week. Continuing the environmental conversations we had been having at Bramblefields, I wanted to help the children think about what diversity meant and the importance of it:
The biodiversity in nature that gives us life and inspiration,
Diversity in humankind that gives us different cultures, stories and history
And diversity in imagination that gives us creativity, new ideas and inspiration.

We gathered our sketches and ideas and went back to the classroom to embellish our artwork with colour and stories. We created whilst listening to a recording of birdsong at Bramblefields and reflected on our morning: It’s so overgrown – it feels like an adventure… I was calm… I was free… I was a bird… I was a cloud… I am nature.

What is nature for?

07/05/21

Shea: We are nature.
Bea: Everything is nature.

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Blue painting hand and two drawings of hands

(by Caroline Wendling) We have now spent three wonderful days with Badger class (a mixed class of years 3 and 4/7 to 9 year olds) at Howard Primary School in Bury St Edmunds as co-researchers on the Eco-Capabilities project.  We have created connections with nature and experienced a sense of wellbeing. We have been making art inspired by being outside the classroom, often in a part of the school grounds the children don’t go. Every morning unlocking the big green gate feels like opening our portal to special place. There are screams of joy and excitement and one child commented I am in heaven. It is a place that children associate with ‘camping’. They run behind the line of leylandii trees where the school is out of site and onto a large area of grass encircled by a line of trees on three sides. 

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Children by the gate
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Children running to our place

As a group we are tuning in to a sensory and tactile approach to nature. We invite the children to notice things and ask questions. After Jack R. asked why is grass so spiky? we all found ourselves touching the grass and trying to describe how it feels. I noticed how the children enjoyed shutting their eyes for what seemed ages, focussing on their olfactory sense and listening to the sounds with amplified attention. Ben described how he could smell honey and hear the sun burning on my back.

The children are eager to explore the site. A fascination with sticks took us on a journey of discovery on one of the days. I enjoyed how if together we described the shape, colour and texture of a stick, then attention was greater and drawings became more intricate and observed. One drawing grew horns to show its rough texture. Mia said that it helped to draw it again …the first drawing looked like a love heart and the second one like a real one. When the children were asked to collect natural things in small envelopes, Elwin placed a stick taller than him in it!

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Path and rabbit hole etc

A week later sticks became the medium to make large drawings on the field. Children chose their own partners and decided between themselves what to draw. Millie, Evie and Lola drew a shape together with three different interpretations: a lake, a rabbit hole, a road to school. I admired their open-minded spirits and imaginative interpretations. The same drawing was appropriated later by Jack C. who commented how I am making a big stick by filling in the shape and reducing it as necessary.

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Branches on grass

The contents of these envelopes have become subjects for many art activities during the classroom time in the afternoon. We are showing the children how to mix paint to get nature’s colours. With incredible attention they are discovering the alchemy-like secrets of paint. Bea got lost mixing an abundant quantity of colour swatches. Children are consulting with each other on how to best proceed, helping each other by suggesting specific mixes and expressing their satisfaction when contented with their efforts. We witnessed many complex discussions, attentive minds and a sense of achievement. No one got annoyed, bored or gave up.

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Bea Swaps Artwork
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Charlie swaps Artwork
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Colour of nature Artwork

And what happens when you give children the permission to ‘design’, ‘paint ‘, ‘draw’ and ‘tattoo’ their hands inspired by nature? Well, they have such fun. Even those reluctant to colour their hands and offered an alternative changed their minds! Some managed to paint two hands and some had to be asked to stop as we had reached the end of the day.  Over the three days nature had been a perfect companion! I can’t wait to meet the children again.

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 Bea's & hands
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Elwin Hands
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Hands
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Jack Hands

Drawing into Nature

04/05/21

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Shirley playground

(by Sally Todd) We have started on our long awaited project with Year Four at Shirley Community Primary school, using art and creative exploration to engage with local outside spaces and the nature around us.The children remembered us from last year and their responses to my first question ‘what is art?’ felt like a clear sign we were ready to begin:
Art is really beautiful and magical because it’s full of bright colours.
Art’s a poetic way to describe nature and the things around you.

Outside on ‘the field’ at Shirley we lay down in the grass, using all of our senses to attune to the rhythms and textures of our surroundings. I felt calm and relieved….I felt so relaxed I could feel the grass moving.  We invited the children to do mark making in response to the sounds around us, then draw something in the landscape without looking at the drawing to free up and energise the lines. Some children were initially tentative or self-conscious with their drawing, though with encouragement became emboldened.

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Sound marks
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Drawing without looking

The school grounds also include a small ‘orchard’, a vegetable garden and a nature area. We settled in the nature area, slowing down to observe closely. Some children focused on drawing the shapes and details in a leaf, blossom or bird’s feather, adding colour with dandelions and grass. For others there was a desire to keep moving and explore, finding tadpoles in the pond and of course the climbing tree.
Look tiny insects they’ve got so many legs.
These are animal markings I know.
I saw a number three pattern on a tree.

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Drawing into nature
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Feather and nettle
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Feather detail

After lunch we returned outside to experiment together with graphite, charcoal, pastels and more dandelions on a giant piece of paper. Suddenly distant smoke transformed the skyline and the children’s charcoal marks intensified, creating swirling ‘black holes’ and ‘villages’ covered in a charcoal ‘smoke’ through their embodied experience.

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Charcoal smoke drawing
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The 'village'

On our second session, we ventured out of school to explore the nearby and surprisingly expansive space of Bramblefields, the local nature reserve next door to the school.

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The pond area
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The ceramic mound

We made bird mapping drawings, carefully watching the movement of bird flights above us in the sky. Look how much I got, I saw ten…I want to be a bird because there are no rules when being a bird.

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Bird mapping drawings

We visited the contrasting spaces of the trail area, with a canopy of twisted trees, and the open scrub and grassland, with the bio-diverse habitats of the ponds and the dry hill. The hill is covered in tiny recycled crushed ceramic pieces and was created by the ecology team at the City Council to offer a dry micro climate for plants and wildlife. It became known by the children as pottery hill, rat hill and the toilet chips and captured their imaginations in many ways - maybe it was a cafe…..it looks like the stars and the galaxy.

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Stars and galaxy

Back in school, the children made nature slides and imaginary drawings with ‘Shirley colour’ inspired by their visit to Bramblefields. The hill had now become layered with secret stories of creatures and treasure under the ground as if a portal to another world.

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Nature finds
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Nature slides
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Tree drawing
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Tree drawing
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The hill
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Under ground
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Ladybird and tiger
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Ancient treasure